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            LARS BJERRE         

                      
  BLEED THE SILENCE
 

Vernissage: 
10.09.2010  7 pm

Exhibition: 11.09.2010-15.10.2010 
 


“[...] We wanted to bleed the silence, shake off the exile of conversation [...]”
 (Excerpt from the poem Complaint by Jules Laforgue, 1885)  


For his newest exhibition title, the Danish artist Lars Bjerre (*1975) coincidentally found
inspiration in Jules Laforgue’s (1860-1887) melancholic and simultaneously ironic poetry-
language, just as Patrik Caulfield did in the 1970s. Entitling his exhibition “Bleed the silence”
after a line of Laforgue’s poem Complaint, Bjerre strikingly evokes associations of visceral
violence. However, the expected cruelty is not to be found on his picture’s surface, but
rather inside the portrayed character’s fractured psyche and their hidden (forgotten and old)
memories. 
Bjerre juxtaposes the huge and roughly painted portrait of an old lady moving her
head; two young men covered by cut-off animal heads; and two triptychs showing a
confused woman positioned next to colourful balloons and a furious man, a rat and a
blackboard. But what unites those figures? Seemingly so different, they are all helplessly
apathetic towards their (lost) time and their determination of identification – fearing the the
presence and displaced past, which outdistanced them.
Via theatrical and melancholic scenes, Bjerre exposes his characters’ nostalgia and
their fear of existence in narrative images. The picture “The exclusive club of forgotten
memories,” for instance, dramatizes momentariness: the senile woman’s inner loneliness
and her isolation is ridiculously denuded by the balloon’s childish goofiness. Similarly, the
old man is confronted with a symbol of youth – a blackboard scribbled with chalk doodles of
a moving skull, which turns into his own portrait. Trapped in a conversation with their own
self, some of Bjerre’s distressed protagonists simply hide under an animal head, in order to
finally bleed the silence.
 
 
                                                                                                              Anna-Lena Werner



For more information, interview requests, and images, please contact Vivienne Micallef at
Vivienne.micallef@torstrasse161.de.



                                                                                                                          
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